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    Organization

    Ghost Light Theatricals

    2220 NW Market St.
    Lower Level
    Seattle , WA 98107
    206-395-5458 (206-395-5GLT)

    Website: http://ghostlighttheatricals.org


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    Ghost Light Theatricals’ mission is to create bold, imaginative stories inspired by classic texts that resonate with a modern world. Founded in 2003, Ghost Light Theatricals is a 501(c)(3) non-profit theatre company based in Seattle.

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    Media Reviews


    • Event Name: The Last Days of Judas Iscariot
      Article: Theater reviews: 'The Last Days of Judas Iscariot' and 'Help'
      The Seattle Times - Apr 20, 2012
      By Tom Keogh, Special to The Seattle Times

      'The Last Days of Judas Iscariot'

      Did Judas Iscariot really betray Jesus and, if so, why?

      Historical evidence suggests that question has been kicked around since the second century. The standard answer is that Judas, one of… Expand

      'The Last Days of Judas Iscariot'

      Did Judas Iscariot really betray Jesus and, if so, why?

      Historical evidence suggests that question has been kicked around since the second century. The standard answer is that Judas, one of the 12 apostles who followed Jesus during his years of teaching, arranged Christ's arrest and eventual crucifixion for reward money.

      There have been many alternative theories explored in scholarship and art. Playwright Stephen Adly Guirgis' "The Last Days of Judas Iscariot," currently on stage in a riveting production by Ghost Light Theatricals, grabs hold of one popular idea and relentlessly explores its moral, historical and existential implications.

      In his wild, equally funny and shattering dreamscape of a courtroom drama-comedy, Guirgis (whose "The Motherf***er with a Hat" is currently on Broadway) portrays Judas as a follower who expected Christ to lead a revolt against Roman occupiers. When that didn't happen, he tried to force the prophet's miracle-making hand by giving him to the authorities.

      Judas (Joey Fechtel) spends much of this play in a catatonic state, crushed by guilt over the consequences of his actions. (When he gets to move and speak, Fechtel becomes a deeply sympathetic anti-hero.) Meanwhile, a jury hears testimony about whether he should spend eternity in hell.

      On a tellingly grim set evoking some abandoned factory in the nowhere-afterlife of Purgatory, Judas' trial becomes a circus of compromised souls, calling on such bizarre witnesses as a condescending Sigmund Freud (Raymond L. Williams) and a creepily eloquent Pontius Pilate (Chris Martinez). Other striking players are Judas' silky defense attorney (Valerie Brunetto), a fawning prosecutor (Stephen Scheide) and a beleaguered Civil War-era judge (Justin Ison).

      The entire cast and director Rob Raas-Bergquist are clearly inspired by Guirgis' mad fable and killer torrents of surgically precise dialogue. Brenan Grant's performance as Satan raises the story's tension and stakes to an almost unbearable degree.

      Through Sunday, Ballard Underground, 2220 N.W. Market St., Seattle; $12-$15 (www.ghostlighttheatricals.org).

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    • Event Name: The Last Days of Judas Iscariot
      Article: Mitt Romney and Judas Iscariot
      The Stranger - Apr 10, 2012
      By Brendan Kiley

      A cosmological courtroom drama about the most infamous betrayal in Western civilization, The Last Days of Judas Iscariot is a production that struggles with itself—which is fitting, since its main character has the same problem. Judas was written by… Expand

      A cosmological courtroom drama about the most infamous betrayal in Western civilization, The Last Days of Judas Iscariot is a production that struggles with itself—which is fitting, since its main character has the same problem. Judas was written by Stephen Adly Guirgis (Jesus Hopped the "A" Train, The Motherfucker with the Hat) and originally directed by Philip Seymour Hoffman for the Public Theater. The script calls people throughout history and mythology to the stand—Sigmund Freud, Mother Teresa, Pontius Pilate, Satan himself, et al.—to figure out what Judas's deal was. Did he flip Jesus to the Roman occupiers and their lapdogs in the Judaic priesthood because Jesus was truly dangerous, the Osama bin Laden of His time? Did he do it to protect the fledgling anti-Roman revolution? Or was Judas just plain eeeeevil?

      Judas is an unevenly entertaining, and occasionally harrowing, two and a half hours of courtroom testimony and flashbacks. The sprawling play has 15 actors who are sometimes too enthusiastic for their own good, screeching out lines (especially in the first act) that are barely understandable. At other times, it slows down and lets its quiet, sinister undertones come out and cut to the bone, as in the scene where Satan (performed as an unctuous and manipulative nightclub denizen by Brenan Grant) hunts down a guilt-racked post-betrayal Judas (Joey Fechtel) in a bar while he's getting wasted and contemplating suicide. Judas also has an excellently chilling scene in hell between a near-catatonic Judas and an aloof Jesus Christ (Dylan Twiner) who speaks in vague aphorisms. Jesus airily tells Judas he has the power to forgive himself, that salvation is his for the asking. Judas tells Jesus to fuck off—that He has no idea what He's talking about.

      Judas smashes together the conventions of courtroom dramas and the anxieties of contemporary Christianity—sin, redemption, free will, why we're so hung up on the ideas of desert-dwellers from 2,000 years ago—into a colorful and sometimes messy patchwork. Collapse

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